A bigger splash – David Hockney – 1967

A bigger splash - David Hockney - 1967

A bigger splash - David Hockney - 1967

In this painting, David Hockney, English artist, shows us the exterior of a house somewhere in the southwest coast of the USA, probably in California, place where Hockney lives. The straight lines and the uniform colors (from the acrilyc paint) give us the idea of extreme desolation, monotony, a heavy warmness, humidity. The colors of the property are very warm, in opposition from those of the pool and the sky.
In the painting we do not see any moving being, but we just sense it by the splash, which interrupts the general composition of the work: someone has dive into the pool. And, next to the one only chair in the painting, we have the feeling of someone who is very lonely, or abandoned.
This work is often stated as one of the pop art icons but, despite the superficiality of the movement, here Hockney seems to invite us to introspect ourselves: one thing that does not happen to me when I see a painting by Andy Warhol.

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~ by Álvaro Mazzino on July 5, 2010.

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