Woman | Joan Miró | 1934

Woman | Joan Miró | 1934

Woman | Joan Miró | 1934

The biography of Miró has no so much interesting details. He is original from Barcelona, Spain; but he really started his artistic career in 1920 when he moves to Paris, place where, along with other writers, filmmakers and other artists he develops his personal style.  

Miró rejected to be part of any artistic movement. He believed that this would limit his imagination and his ability to express himself. However, this doesn’t seem to matter to his friend André Bretón, founder of the surrealist movement and writer of its manifesto, who is going to say: “Miró is the most surreal of us all”.

Although his work changed with time, color, organic shapes and well-defined flattened figures, are all characteristics of Miró’s work.

From 1932, with the aim of “killing the conventional methods of painting”, he began with a series of paintings called wild paintings, in which we find excessively deformed human figures á la Picasso, with huge sexual organs, little extremities and bright colors over a dark background. Woman is one of these paintings.  

There are several different interpretations for this canvas in particular: as the human shape is, almost, nonexistent, many think that, because of the colors, is like a bird. Many others believe that all the wild paintings express an unconscious prophecy by the artist regarding the political panorama over Spain. The dark colors in the background would be metaphorical of the imminent Spanish civil war by the hand of Francisco Franco and the 2nd world war. Personally, I think this is too forced: Miró wasn’t very interested in politics and nor his art has anything to do with it. Finally, there are some that think that Woman is an insect like the praying mantis. Miró, at that time, had problems with his wife Olga and the mantis could be a symbol of the negative concept he had over women, because this Little bug attracts male to eat them after the copula: the woman in the painting attracts through her curves and her genitals at the same time that, disturbingly, she has sharp fangs to devour the incautious man.

In the end… monstrous art.

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~ by Álvaro Mazzino on August 20, 2010.

2 Responses to “Woman | Joan Miró | 1934”

  1. Picasso’s first wife was Olga Khokhlova. Miro married Pilar Juncosa in 1929 and remained married until his death in 1983.

  2. With a majority of Jordan retros sitting on retailers’ shelves for weeks and months, the stores need something new to sell, and the NMD happens to be that sneaker.

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