Ocean Park No 27 | Richard Diebenkorn | 1970

Ocean Park No 27 | Richard Diebenkorn | 1970

Ocean Park No 27 | Richard Diebenkorn | 1970

In 1967, Richard Diebenkorn abandons figurative painting to return to devote himself to abstract painting. This turn in his path is represented in the series of 140 works called Ocean Park.

These paintings are named after the neighborhood where Diebenkorn had his study, in Santa Monica, California. There, the artist wanted to put in the canvas the aerial views of his community, reducing its landscapes to simple fields of flat color.

In No 27, the artist paints one of these views, where the central triangle provides the base for the composition and the other color fields, which are divided by white stripes to maximize the effect they have on the spectator. Although the fields are flat, we have the sensation of certain depth, provided by the textures produced by the brushstrokes, specially, at the left bottom of the painting. Diebenkorn uses colors representing the Ocean Park landscape, like yellow like sand, white like sun and blue like the sea.

Diebenkorn himself is going to say that abstraction allows him a luminosity he couldn’t achieve with figurative painting; and this luminosity is key in Ocean Park No 27.

Out artist is now considered as one of the most important abstract expressionist of the east coast of the USA.

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~ by Álvaro Mazzino on September 17, 2010.

3 Responses to “Ocean Park No 27 | Richard Diebenkorn | 1970”

  1. I think it is the West Coast. Where he lived a lot – Berkeley, Santa Monica…

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